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prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials
Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.
Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here
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timelightbox:

Photo: Sayed Asif Mahmud
Inside Bangladesh’s Cheap Cigarette Factories
Sayed Asif Mahmud’s powerful photos document the dangers that workers face in Bangladesh’s tobacco factories.
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"Looking into relationships in a broad sense, be it personal, political, religious or social, I see the essential need to delve into these relationships and research where we have gone wrong, to the dark, yet true side of life, to find answers in order to progress, that is, if we allow ourselves. It is in my work that I have all the space and freedom to compliment this, to ask questions, offer suggestions and ask for forgiveness… all I want is to groom and nurture the love and respect which seems to have frozen amongst ourselves and to free the massive tension that holds us."
Virginia Chihota (via blackcontemporaryart)
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"Don’t make stuff because you want to make money — it will never make you enough money. And don’t make stuff because you want to get famous — because you will never feel famous enough. Make gifts for people — and work hard on making those gifts in the hope that those people will notice and like the gifts."
John Green (via this-is-dedicated)
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cross cultural contamination and/or assimilation (?)
Tsedaye Makonnen 
Panoply Performance Laboratory 
2014
cross cultural contamination and/or assimilation (?)
Tsedaye Makonnen 
Panoply Performance Laboratory 
2014
cross cultural contamination and/or assimilation (?)
Tsedaye Makonnen 
Panoply Performance Laboratory 
2014
cross cultural contamination and/or assimilation (?)
Tsedaye Makonnen 
Panoply Performance Laboratory 
2014
cross cultural contamination and/or assimilation (?)
Tsedaye Makonnen 
Panoply Performance Laboratory 
2014
cross cultural contamination and/or assimilation (?)
Tsedaye Makonnen 
Panoply Performance Laboratory 
2014
cross cultural contamination and/or assimilation (?)
Tsedaye Makonnen 
Panoply Performance Laboratory 
2014
cross cultural contamination and/or assimilation (?)
Tsedaye Makonnen 
Panoply Performance Laboratory 
2014
cross cultural contamination and/or assimilation (?)
Tsedaye Makonnen 
Panoply Performance Laboratory 
2014
cross cultural contamination and/or assimilation (?)
Tsedaye Makonnen 
Panoply Performance Laboratory 
2014
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ganzeerism:

Project: Not Yours to Touch
Date: June 2014
Description: There’s a sad misconception among many men (and even some women unfortunately) that if a girl dresses revealingly then she’s fair game, and there for anyone to touch or worse. This here poster, featuring artist/model Maya Desnuda, is my attempt at tackling the subject matter. Available for sale on my webshop as an art print, t-shirt, and even an iPhone case.
Made available for sale on my web-shop as art prints, stretched canvas, t-shirts, hoodies, and even rugs.
ganzeerism:

Project: Not Yours to Touch
Date: June 2014
Description: There’s a sad misconception among many men (and even some women unfortunately) that if a girl dresses revealingly then she’s fair game, and there for anyone to touch or worse. This here poster, featuring artist/model Maya Desnuda, is my attempt at tackling the subject matter. Available for sale on my webshop as an art print, t-shirt, and even an iPhone case.
Made available for sale on my web-shop as art prints, stretched canvas, t-shirts, hoodies, and even rugs.
ganzeerism:

Project: Not Yours to Touch
Date: June 2014
Description: There’s a sad misconception among many men (and even some women unfortunately) that if a girl dresses revealingly then she’s fair game, and there for anyone to touch or worse. This here poster, featuring artist/model Maya Desnuda, is my attempt at tackling the subject matter. Available for sale on my webshop as an art print, t-shirt, and even an iPhone case.
Made available for sale on my web-shop as art prints, stretched canvas, t-shirts, hoodies, and even rugs.
ganzeerism:

Project: Not Yours to Touch
Date: June 2014
Description: There’s a sad misconception among many men (and even some women unfortunately) that if a girl dresses revealingly then she’s fair game, and there for anyone to touch or worse. This here poster, featuring artist/model Maya Desnuda, is my attempt at tackling the subject matter. Available for sale on my webshop as an art print, t-shirt, and even an iPhone case.
Made available for sale on my web-shop as art prints, stretched canvas, t-shirts, hoodies, and even rugs.
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mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
mymodernmet:

In India, there is a long-standing folk art known as rangoli (or kolam or Muggu), in which stunning patterns are created on the ground using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, and more. The bright designs are usually made during auspicious events like Diwali, Onam, Pongal, and other Indian festivals, as well as celebrations like weddings.
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mymodernmet:

Japanese artist Yusuke Asai decorated the walls and ceiling of the Niranjana School with a sprawling, intricate mural painted with mud. This stunning work was created for the Wall Art Festival held in Sujata Village, a small village in the poor Bihar state of Northeast India
mymodernmet:

Japanese artist Yusuke Asai decorated the walls and ceiling of the Niranjana School with a sprawling, intricate mural painted with mud. This stunning work was created for the Wall Art Festival held in Sujata Village, a small village in the poor Bihar state of Northeast India
mymodernmet:

Japanese artist Yusuke Asai decorated the walls and ceiling of the Niranjana School with a sprawling, intricate mural painted with mud. This stunning work was created for the Wall Art Festival held in Sujata Village, a small village in the poor Bihar state of Northeast India
mymodernmet:

Japanese artist Yusuke Asai decorated the walls and ceiling of the Niranjana School with a sprawling, intricate mural painted with mud. This stunning work was created for the Wall Art Festival held in Sujata Village, a small village in the poor Bihar state of Northeast India
mymodernmet:

Japanese artist Yusuke Asai decorated the walls and ceiling of the Niranjana School with a sprawling, intricate mural painted with mud. This stunning work was created for the Wall Art Festival held in Sujata Village, a small village in the poor Bihar state of Northeast India